What you need to know about the MRCP PACES examiners.

There are 11 of them and only one of you, and they determine your success or failure.  But who are they?

For candidates sitting MRCP PACES in the UK (and most other places around the world) the examiners are a collection of senior hospital consultants.  Their motivation is seeing the next cadre of hospital doctors trained to an adequate standard – and that includes being able to competently examine a patient.

As a minimum, PACES examiners have held a CCT in a medical specialty for at least two years prior to starting as an examiner, and be working in a substantive post.  They need to be active clinically and involved in general medicine.

The other requirements include clinical supervision of core medical trainees in general medicine and having undertaken equality and diversity training in the last three years.

Your examiners will all have completed a day-long training course to ensure reproducibility and fairness, and are encouraged to examine at least 30 candidates per year – a process that will usually take two or three days.

For each station you will have two examiners, who will take it in turns to lead with asking you questions or observing and taking notes.  Each examiner marks candidates independently, without knowledge of what scores the other examiner is assigning.

So what does the 11th examiner do?  You are likely to not even meet them – their role is to troubleshoot during the examination cycle, collate and check marksheets and compile the candidate performance summaries.  In most cases, the host examiner acts as the 11th examiner.