[vc_row row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” oblique_section=”no” text_align=”left” css_animation=””][vc_column][ultimate_heading main_heading=”Candidate brief” main_heading_color=”#000000″ sub_heading_color=”#000000″ main_heading_style=”font-weight:bold;” main_heading_font_size=”desktop:36px;”]

“This patient has presented to the acute medical take following a seizure.  Please take a history and discuss your findings with the examiners.”

[/ultimate_heading][vc_empty_space image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_video link=”https://vimeo.com/154048177″][vc_empty_space image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_row_inner row_type=”row” type=”full_width” use_row_as_full_screen_section_slide=”no” text_align=”left” css_animation=””][vc_column_inner width=”1/4″][stat_counter icon_size=”32″ counter_title=”Station time” counter_value=”20″ counter_suffix=” minutes” speed=”3″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/4″][stat_counter icon_size=”32″ counter_title=”Time for this encounter” counter_value=”10″ counter_suffix=” minutes” speed=”3″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/4″][stat_counter icon_size=”32″ counter_title=”Maximum time to examine your patient” counter_value=”8″ counter_suffix=” minutes” speed=”3″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/4″][stat_counter icon_size=”32″ counter_title=”Minimum time for discussion and questions” counter_value=”2″ counter_suffix=” minutes” speed=”3″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_empty_space image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” oblique_section=”no” text_align=”left” css_animation=””][vc_column][vc_accordion style=”accordion”][vc_accordion_tab title=”Common examiner questions”][vc_column_text]Common examiner questions include the following:

  1. What do you think this patient has?
  2. How would you like to investigate this patient next?
  3. What do you think the underlying cause of this patient’s signs is?

[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title=”Diagnosis and clinical signs”][vc_column_text]This patient has a port wine stain over one side of his face and a history of seizures.[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title=”Discussion”][vc_column_text]This patient has typical appearances and history for Sturge-Weber syndrome. This is a congenital defect causing both neurological and skin problems.

The main recognised features of Sturge-Weber syndrome are:

  • Port-wine stains of the face;
  • Glaucome;
  • Seizures;
  • Mental retardation;
  • Headache;
  • Ipsilateral leptomeningeal angioma.

Many patients also have a hemiparesis and / or hemianopia.  These may arise transiently.

Sturge-Weber is arises in embryos from errors in the mesodermal and ectodermal development.  Seizures are incredibly common (>70%).

Due to the complex underpinnings of this disease, treatment is largely symptomatic.  Glaucoma is treated first line with beta blocker eye drops, seizures with carbamazepine or sometimes neurosurgery if intractable.  Headaches are treated with paracetamol or a triptan.  The characteristic dermatological abnormality may be mitigated somewhat with dye laser photocoagulation.[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title=”Specimen case presentation”][vc_column_text]”This patient has a port wine stain over one side of his face and a history of seizures.  The likely diagnosis is Sturge Weber syndrome.  I would like to check for glaucoma and perform a cognitive examination.”[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][/vc_accordion][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” oblique_section=”no” text_align=”left” css_animation=””][vc_column][/vc_column][/vc_row]